Monday, 10 August 2020 00:00

In podiatry, biomechanics involves assessing the structure, alignment and function of the feet. The foot provides us with the ability to walk upright and has developed to adapt to whatever surfaces we walk on. Because the average person takes between 5,000 and 18,000 steps in a single day, the foot can experience stress from repetitiveness, resulting in injury. While options such as orthotics can help prevent injury, paying special attention to the strength and flexibility of the feet allow their function to improve. Therefore, if you are actively on your feet, make sure to consult with a podiatrist to help find any predisposed issues.

If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Advanced Podiatry Associates. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Biomechanics in Podiatry

Podiatric biomechanics is a particular sector of specialty podiatry with licensed practitioners who are trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and lower leg. Biomechanics deals with the forces that act against the body, causing an interference with the biological structures. It focuses on the movement of the ankle, the foot and the forces that interact with them.

A History of Biomechanics

  • Biomechanics dates back to the BC era in Egypt where evidence of professional foot care has been recorded.
  • In 1974, biomechanics gained a higher profile from the studies of Merton Root, who claimed that by changing or controlling the forces between the ankle and the foot, corrections or conditions could be implemented to gain strength and coordination in the area.

Modern technological improvements are based on past theories and therapeutic processes that provide a better understanding of podiatric concepts for biomechanics. Computers can provide accurate information about the forces and patterns of the feet and lower legs.

Understanding biomechanics of the feet can help improve and eliminate pain, stopping further stress to the foot.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Northampton and Allentown, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 03 August 2020 00:00

The Tarsal Tunnel is a narrow tunnel in the ankle, next to the ankle bone, that serves as a pathway for nerves, veins, arteries and tendons. Tarsal tunnel syndrome occurs when the tibial nerve in this tunnel gets squeezed or pressed, resulting in multiple issues. One common cause of tarsal tunnel syndrome is flat feet because flat feet can cause the heel to turn outward and put pressure on the nerve. Additionally, a varicose vein, a cyst, a swollen tendon, or a bone spur can also put pressure on the nerve. Other causes of tarsal tunnel syndrome include swelling from conditions such as an ankle sprain, diabetes, or arthritis. If you are experiencing a tingling or burning sensation, numbness, or a shooting pain in the foot, you may be experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, and it is recommended that you consult with a podiatrist.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact one of our podiatrists of Advanced Podiatry Associates. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
  • Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
  • The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
  • If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Northampton and Allentown, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Thursday, 30 July 2020 00:00

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Monday, 27 July 2020 00:00

An ingrown toenail is a common condition in which the corner of a nail grows into the surrounding skin, leading to inflammation, pain, and sometimes even infection. While home remedies and preventative care may be adequate for treating milder cases of ingrown toenails, sometimes medical intervention is necessary, especially for moderate to severe cases. Seeing a podiatrist may benefit people who are prone to recurrent ingrown nails. There are a variety of medical treatments for ingrown nails, such as lifting or partially removing the nail. A recent study has found that patients who receive medical treatment for ingrown nails are generally satisfied with the outcome and may experience an improvement in their overall quality of life. If you find yourself afflicted with painful or frequent ingrown toenails, it is recommended that you visit a podiatrist.

Ingrown toenails can become painful if they are not treated properly. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact one of our podiatrists of Advanced Podiatry Associates. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails occur when a toenail grows sideways into the bed of the nail, causing pain, swelling, and possibly infection.

Causes

  • Bacterial infections
  • Improper nail cutting such as cutting it too short or not straight across
  • Trauma to the toe, such as stubbing, which causes the nail to grow back irregularly
  • Ill-fitting shoes that bunch the toes too close together
  • Genetic predisposition

Prevention

Because ingrown toenails are not something found outside of shoe-wearing cultures, going barefoot as often as possible will decrease the likeliness of developing ingrown toenails. Wearing proper fitting shoes and using proper cutting techniques will also help decrease your risk of developing ingrown toenails.

Treatment

Ingrown toenails are a very treatable foot condition. In minor cases, soaking the affected area in salt or antibacterial soaps will not only help with the ingrown nail itself, but also help prevent any infections from occurring. In more severe cases, surgery is an option. In either case, speaking to your podiatrist about this condition will help you get a better understanding of specific treatment options that are right for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Northampton and Allentown, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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